Who Qualifies For SASSA’s War Veterans Grant?

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Do you want to apply for the War Veterans grant from SASSA but you're unsure of whether you qualify? Keep reading to find out whether you're eligible to apply for this social grant. 


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The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) provides social grants to South Africans who are vulnerable to poverty and in need of state support. One of these grants is the War Veterans Grant. 

The War Veterans Grant is geared towards people who were former soldiers who fought in the Second World War (1939-1945) or the Korean War (1950-1953) and are unable to support themselves.

To qualify for the grant, the applicant must meet the following requirements: 

  • be a South African citizen or permanent resident
  • live in South Africa
  • be 60 years of age or older or be disabled
  • have fought in the Second World War or the Korean War
  • not receive any other social grant for yourself  
  • not be cared for in a state institution
  • not earn more than R 86 280 if you are single or R172 560 if married
  • not have assets worth more than R 1 227 600 if you are single or R 2 455 200 if you are married.

People who qualify for this grant will receive an amount of R 1 910 per month.

When applying for the War Veteran's Grant at a SASSA Office, you'll need to have the following documents with you: 

  • Your 13-digit bar-coded identity document (ID. If you don't have an ID:
    • You must complete an affidavit on a standard SASSA format in the presence of a Commissioner of Oaths who is not a SASSA official.
    • You must bring a sworn statement signed by a reputable person (like a councillor, traditional leader, social worker, minister of religion or school principal) who can verify your name and age.
    • You must bring proof that you have applied for an at the Department of Home Affairs.
    • A temporary ID issued by the Department of Home Affairs (if applicable)
  • Proof of your war service, e.g. certificate of service.
  • If you are under 60, a medical assessment or report stating that you cannot work.
  • Proof of your marital status. If:
    • you are single, an affidavit stating that you are single
    • you are married, your marriage certificate and your spouse’s identity document
    • you are divorced, your divorce order
    • your spouse is dead, your spouse’s death certificate.
    • If you or your spouse is employed, your pay slips.
    • If you are unemployed, your Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) blue book or discharge certificate from your previous employer.
    • If you have a bank account, your bank statements for the last three months.
    • If you have investments, information on the interest and dividends you earn.

You can call SASSA at at 0800 601 011 for more information or visit the SASSA website. 


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